Fire Resistance Requirements for Balconies on Residential Buildings - Able Canopies Ltd

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Introduction

Hello and welcome to our CPD. Firstly, I'd like to thank you for participating in this learning module and I hope that you find it knowledgeable and informative.

 

There are five aims and five objectives within this CPD which you will discover next. You will:

 

  • Discover who Able Canopies Limited are, and why they have created this CPD.
  • Then be guided through the changes on the building amendment regulations 2018, that came into force on the 21st of December 2018. Then
  • Be guided through the points on the advice note on balconies on residential buildings, that was issued on the 24th of June 2019.
  • Be shown examples of products that adhere to the regulations and advice note.
  • Be able to download a selection of resources that you can print for further reading and future reference.
  • Understand the building amendment regulations 2018, that came into force on the 21st of December 2018, and how it affects you and your projects.
  • Understand the advice note on balconies on residential buildings that was issued on the 24th of June 2019, so you can incorporate it into your projects.
  • Understand the risks that can arise from using flammable products on balconies.
  • Be able to take the knowledge gained and incorporate it into your future projects to adhere to UK regulations.
  • Be able to confidently source products that are high quality, long lasting, easy to install and adhere to all regulations outlined in this CPD.

 

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Next you will find out who Able Canopies are and how they can help you.

 

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Abel Canopies Limited

Abel Canopies are a UK designer, manufacturer, supplier and installer of canopy's shelters and shade sails.

 

Able Canopies was first established in 1997 and have completed over 3500 UK commercial installations. They are a specialist design and build contract are for canopy's, shelters and shade sails. Their sister companies include Alideck, who design, manufacture and supply aluminium decking and The Milwood Group, who design, manufacture and supply car ports, verandas and canopies to the trade.

 

Able Canopies supply and install their products across the UK and work with many sectors including leisure and hospitality, local authorities, education, retail and healthcare, and regularly work with architects and main contractors.

 

Able Canopies are proudly certified to a range of well recognised assessment boards including ISO 9001, ISO 14,001, OHSAS 18,001. They are committed to delivering quality, caring for the environment and health and safety.

 

Able Canopies follow all CDM 2015 regulations when installing our products on site. Our aluminium decking range is sold as supply only and we therefore do not have involvement in the design of the project or installation of the decking. It is therefore the buyer’s responsibility to ensure they follow CDM 2015 requirements and regulations in relation to duties of designer's, duties of contractors and schedule 3- working at heights.

 

As mentioned, Able Canopies limited supply their products for many sectors and have installed structures for a selection of well-known businesses. In the retail leisure and hospitality industry, they have installed for well-known companies including; KFC, Morrisons, Lidl, Specsavers, EasyJet, BMW and, Mercedes-Benz. Able Canopies limited have worked with many councils over the years including; their local Essex County Council, Manchester City Council and, Somerset County Council. Contractors that Able Canopies have worked with include Bouygues, Morgan Sindall, Neilcott, Wates, Wilmott Dixon and, Kier.

 

To give architects and contractors product solutions that adhere to the new regulations, Able Canopies limited introduced the Alideck range of products, which were a welcoming help to combat the issues that have arisen from the recent updates covered in this CPD. The Alideck range features aluminium decking boards and accessories that are A2 S1 D0 rated. The range includes boards for balconies as well as ground level installations.

 

Next you will be guided through the building amendment which was issued in December 2018.

 

It's advised that you have your pen and paper handy to jot down notes from this point forward. Although the full documents can be downloaded at the end of this CPD.

 

In November 2018 an amendment to the building regulations 2010 was laid before parliament by the Secretary of State, which came into effect on the 21st of December 2018, and was titled the building amendment regulations 2018. The amendment focuses on the materials used on the exterior of residential buildings that comprises of one or more dwelling. It was the tragedies that had hit the press such as the Grenfell tower fire in June 2018 that prompted these changes to add safety to the persons living in such accommodation. In this section you will find the amends listed to help you better understand them. As mentioned at the end of this CPD you can download the full official document released by the government from the resources section.

 

The building amendment regulations 2018.


The amendments came into force on the 21st of December 2018 you can find out how this effects projects that started before or after this date further on in this CPD.

 

Number one states that these regulations will be officially referred to as the building amendment regulations 2018. Number 2 states that the regulations extend to England and Wales and number 3 states that they do not apply to any buildings in Wales. So just to reiterate that, although the amends extend to Wales, they do not apply to buildings that are in Wales.
In regulation 2, a new paragraph was added after paragraph 5 called paragraph 6, which states that; within these regulations A, any reference to an external wall of a building including a reference to; 1, anything located within any space forming part of the wall; 2, any decoration or other finish applied to any external but not internal surface forming part of the wall; 3, any windows and doors in the wall; and 4, any part of a roof pitched at an angle of more than 70 degrees to the horizontal, if that part of the roofer joins a space within the building to which persons have access but not access only for the purpose of carrying out repairs or maintenance, and B, specified attachment means; 1, a balcony attached to an external wall; 2, a device for reducing heat gain within a building by deflecting sunlight, which is attached to an external wall; or 3, a solar panel attached to an external wall.

 

In regulation 4 paragraph 2 which, covers requirements relating to building work, paragraph 2A after schedule 1 inserts in brackets, in addition to the requirements of regulation 7. In regulation 5 which covers meaning of material change of use after paragraph I omit or and after paragraph J insert or the building is a building described in regulation 7,4 A, where previously it was not. 

 

In regulation 6 which covers requirements relating to material change of use after paragraph 2 insert, 3 subject to paragraph 4, where there is a material change of use described in regulation 5 K, such work, if any, shall be carried out as is necessary to ensure that any external wall, or specified attachment, of the building only contains materials of European classification A2-S1 D0 or A1, classified in accordance with BS EN 13501-1:2007 and A1:2009 entitled fire classification of construction products and building elements. Classification using test data from reaction to fire tests, ISBN 978 0 580 59861 6 published by the British standards institution on the 30th of March 2007 and amended in November 2009. After that also adding a fourth paragraph which states that, 3 does not apply to the items listed in regulation 7 paragraph 3.

 

Regulation 7 which covers materials and workmanship is renumbered as paragraph 1 of that regulation.

 

After regulation 7 paragraph 1, as renumbered insert, subject to paragraph 3, building work should be carried out so that materials which become part of an external wall, or specified attachment of irrelevant building are of European classification A2 S1 D0 or A1 classified in accordance with BS EN 13501-1:2007 and A1:2009 entitled, fire classification of construction products and building elements.

 

Classification using test data from reaction to fire tests, ISBN 9780580598616 published by the British standards institution on the 30th of March 2007, and amended in November 2009. And also added paragraph 2 does not apply to: 

  • A - cavity trays when used between two leaves of masonry;
  • B - any part of a roof other than any part of the roof which falls within paragraph 4, of regulation 2. 6 if that part is connected to an external wall;
  • C - door frames and doors;
  • D - electrical installations;
  • E - insulation and waterproofing materials used below ground level;
  • F - intumescent and fire stopping materials where the inclusion of the materials is necessary to meet the requirements of Part B of schedule 1;
  • G - membranes;
  • H - seals, gaskets, fixings, sealants and backer rods;
  • I - thermal break materials where the inclusion of the materials is necessary to meet the thermal bridging requirements of part L of schedule 1; or
  • J - window frames and glass.

 

And Lastly add that in this regulation;

 

A, irrelevant building means a building with a storey not including rooftop plant areas or any story consisting exclusively of plant rooms at least 18 meters above ground level and which:

  1. contains one or more dwellings;
  2. contains an institution or;
  3. contains a room for residential purposes excluding any room in a hostel, hotel or boarding house;

 

B, above ground level in relation to a storey means above ground level where measured from the lowest ground level adjoining the outside of a building to the top of the floor surface of the storey.

 

The transitional provisions so that the amendments made by regulation 2 do not apply in any case where a building notice or an initial notice has been given to, or full plans deposited with, a local authority before the day these regulations came into force and either the building work to which it relates: 

  • A, has started before that day; or
  • B, is started within the period of two months beginning on that day.

 

And also, in this regulation building notice, initial notice, and full plans have the meanings given in the building regulations 2010.

 

June 2019 Advice Note

Next on the agenda is the advice note on balconies on residential buildings.

 

In June 2019 an advice note was issued by the ministry of housing, communities and local government. The advice note provides advice on the risks arising from balconies on residential buildings. It was written for residents and building owners of residential buildings with multiple dwellings, i.e. Blocks of flats. Although the principles may also apply to other building types. This section will cover the full advice note so you can take it in fully. A link to download the official document is provided at the end of this CPD in the resources section. However, feel free to take notes as you go along.


Section 1 is the summary.

Section 1.1 states that balconies made with combustible materials are a potential source of rapid fire spread on the external wall of residential buildings; and section 1.2 states that the Department position endorsed by the expert panel is that the building regulations required that the material and construction of balconies should have been such that balcony should not compromise resident safety by providing a means of external fire spread. Even before the introduction of the ban on combustible materials in December 2018. They previously issued advice note 14 which advises building owners to ensure they have assessed the risks with regards to external walls and this no clarifies the advice in relation to balconies. Section 1.3 says that building owners should be aware of the materials used in the construction of their external wall, including the construction of balconies and the potential for any horizontal and vertical fire spread, due to their arrangement on the external wall. These should be considered as part of any fire risk assessment. Section 1.4 states that the view of the expert panel is that the removal and replacement of any combustible material used in a balcony construction is the clearest way to prevent external fire spread from balconies and therefore to meet the intention of building regulation requirements and this should occur as soon as practical. Section 1.5 states that building owners should inform residents about the risks arising from the presence of combustible materials on balconies. They should make clear that smoking, the use of barbecues and storage of flammable property on balconies can increase that risk. Advice from Fire and Rescue authorities is clear that barbecues should not be used on balconies.

Section 2 relates to balconies.

Section 2.1 says that, balcony fires can spread to the adjacent balconies or into the building. If combustible materials have been used in the balcony or external wall system, it is possible that fire may spread rapidly across the façade. The risk is increased if combustible materials are used extensively, i.e. In floors and facades of balconies and in certain geometries.

 

Section 2.2 says that, paragraph B4 of schedule 1 of the Building Regulations 2010 sets out that, the external walls of the building shall adequately resist the spread of fire over the walls and from one building to another having regard to the height, use and location of the building.

 

Section 2.3 states that, approved document B paragraph 12.5 also sets out that, the external envelope of a building should not provide a medium for fire spread if it is likely to be a risk to health or safety.

 

Section 2.4 says that, the department view endorsed by the expert panel, is that these provisions apply to buildings regardless of height and that building owners need to ensure that any balconies do not compromise resident safety by providing a means of external fire spread.

 

Section 2.5 states that, the government has taken action to address the risks arising from balconies on new buildings in the revisions to the building regulations introduced in December 2018. This requires balconies on new residential buildings over 18 metres to be made of non-combustible materials, i.e. Materials classified as A1 or A2-S1 D0.

 

Section 2.6 stipulates that, existing buildings of all heights may, however, have balconies which have been constructed using combustible materials, excluding escape balconies which should already have used non-combustible materials.

 

Section 2.7 says that, building owners should therefore ensure that they understand the materials used in the construction of existing balconies, irrespective of the building height. Building owners should assess the associated risk of external fire spread and take appropriate action to manage this risk and ensure compliance with the principle set out in requirement B4 of the building regulations. This should include assessing whether adequate Fire Protection is in place to resist fire spread both across and through the external wall.

 

Section 2.8 states that, where there is doubt over the materials used, or risk presented, building owners should seek professional advice from an appropriately qualified and competent professional, i.e. A fire engineer or construction professional with significant knowledge and experience of fire safety.

 

Section 2.9 says that, building owners should also ensure that any risks arising from balconies are considered as part of the fire risk assessment and information provided to residents.

 

Section 2.10 specifies that, in assessing the level of fire risk from balconies, building owners and professional advisers will want to consider the extent of use of combustible materials the geometry of combustible materials, in balconies and external walls and whether there are large spans of combustible material which may assessed horizontal undo a lateral fire spread.

 

Section 2.11 states that, the view of the expert panel is that the clearest way to prevent the risk of external fire spread is to remove and replace any combustible material with one that is non-combustible classified as A1 or A2-S1 D0.

 

Section 2.12 stipulates that, the fire risk on balconies can also be increased due to the use of balconies as storage. A significant number of balcony fires start from the unsafe disposal of smoking materials and the misuse of barbecues.

 

Section 2.13 states that, building owners should have policies in place as to what can and cannot be stored and used on balconies by residents and should review these in light of the materials used in the balcony construction. They should also communicate with residents to develop their understanding of these risks.

 

Section 2.14 points out that, there have been several incidents of balcony fires which have led to external fire spread. BRE global published examples of this in their 2016 reports, titled fire safety issues with balconies, which can be accessed via the link provided on screen. This link will also be provided at the end of this CPD.

 

Section 2.15 explains that, the BRE report concluded that, managers and risk assessors all need to be mindful of the potential fire risk associated with fires on balconies from their incorporation into the building. The expert panel supports this advice.

 

Section 2.16 says that the BRE global report quoted in section 2.14 also identifies that, there are additional risks from materials used to prevent heat loss through thermal bridging that may increase fire spread. Building owners should understand whether these materials are present and consider them as part of their assessment of risk.

 

Section 3 covers resident concerns.

Section 3.1 explains that, residents with concerns about the fire safety of their premises should contact their managing agent, management company or landlord in the first instance. They should be able to provide them with information on fire safety of the building and how this is being managed. Building owners should respond promptly to any such requests.

 

Section 3.2 states that, if residents are unable to obtain fire safety information, or believe their concerns are not being addressed appropriately, then there is information on the government website about organisations who can provide support via the link provided on screen, which will also be provided at the end of this CPD.

 

And finally, section 3.3 stipulates that, any urgent fire safety concerns should be raised with the local Fire and Rescue service.

 

Next we will go through the additional requirements from the approved document B.

 

Additional requirement should be followed from the existing approved document B volume 1 and approved document B volume 2, in relation to external works on residential buildings over 18 metres in height.

 

Additional Requirements


I will now take you through the additional requirements.

 

Approved document B volume 1 regarding dwellings. The full document can be downloaded at the end of this CPD; however, we have included section 10 below which relates to dwellings in buildings over 18 metres in height.

 

Section 10 is regarding resisting fire spread over external walls.

10.1 states that the external wall of a building should not provide a medium for fire spread, if that is likely to be a risk to health and safety. Combustible materials and cavities in external walls and attachments to them can present such a risk, particularly in tall buildings. The guidance in this section is designed to reduce the risk of vertical fire spread, as well as the risk of ignition from flames coming from adjacent buildings. The fire resistant section 10.2 states that, this section does not deal with fire resistance for external walls. An external wall may need fire resistance to meet the requirements of Section 3 means of escape flats, section 6 load bearing elements of structures flats, or section 11 resisting fire spread from one building to another.

 

Under combustibility of external walls section 10.3 stipulates that external walls of buildings other than those described in regulations 7.4 of the building regulations should achieve either of the following; A, follow the provisions given in paragraphs 10.5 to 10.8 which provide guidance on all of the following; 1, external surfaces; 2, materials and products; 3, cavities and cavity barriers; B, meet the performance criteria given in BRE report BR135 for external rules using full scale test data from BS8414-1 or BS8414-2. Section 10.4 states that, in relation to buildings of any height or use, consideration should be given to the choice of materials including their extent an arrangement used for the external wall, or attachments to the wall, to reduce the risk of fire spread over the wall. In relation to external surfaces section 10.5 states that, external surfaces i.e. Outer most external material of external walls, should comply with the provisions in table 10.1. The provisions in table 10.1 apply to each wall individually in relation to its proximity to the relevant boundary.

 

Table 10.1 shows the reaction to fire performance of external surface of walls. I'll give you a moment to read through. The notes state that in addition to the requirements within this table buildings with a top occupied story above 18 metres, should also meet the provisions of paragraph 10.6. In all cases the advice in paragraph 10.4 should be followed. 1, the restrictions for these buildings apply to all the materials used in the external wall and specified attachments, see paragraphs 10.9 to 10.12 for further guidance. 2, profiled or flat steel sheets at least 0.5 millimetres thick, with an organic coating of no more than 0.2MM thickness is also acceptable. 3, timber cladding at least 9MM thick is also acceptable. 4, 10 metres is measured from the top surface of the roof.

 

Under materials and products section 10.6 states that, in a building with a story 18 meters or more in height, see diagram D6 in appendix D, any insulation product, filler material such as the core materials of metal composite panels, sandwich panels and window spandrel panels, but not including gaskets, sealants, and similar etcetera, used in the construction of an external wall, should be class A2-S3 D2 or better, see appendix B. This restriction does not apply to masonry cavity wall construction which complies with diagram 8.2 in section 8. Where regulation 7.2 applies, that regulation prevails over all the provisions in this paragraph.

 

10.7 states that, best practice guidance for green walls, also called living walls can be found in fire performance of green roofs and walls, published by the department for communities and local government.

 

Under cavities and cavity barriers, section 10.8, cavity barriers should be provided in accordance with Section 5 in dwelling houses in Section 8 in flats.

 

Then we move on to regulation 7 2 and requirement B4. Under materials 10.9 states that, regulation 7 1 A requires that materials used in building work are appropriate for the circumstances in which they are used. Regulations 7 2 sets requirements in respect of external walls and specified attachments in relevant buildings. Please note, guidance on regulation 7 1 can be found in approved document 7. Section 10.10 states that, regulations 7 2 applies to any building with a story at least 18M above ground level, as measured in accordance with diagram D6 in appendix D, and which contains one or more dwellings; an institution; or a room for residential purposes, excluding any room in a hostel, hotel or a boarding house. It requires that all materials which become part of an external wall or specified attachment achieve class A2 S-1 D0 or class A1, other than those exempted by regulation 7 3. Please note the above includes student accommodation, care homes, sheltered housing, hospitals and dormitories in boarding schools, see regulations 7 4 for the definition of relevant buildings. Also note the requirement in regulation 7 2 is limited to materials achieving class A2-S1 D0 or class A1.

 

10.11 states that, external walls and specified attachments are defined in regulation 2 and these definitions include any parts of the external wall as well as balconies, solar panels and sun shading. 10.12 states that regulations 7 3 provides an exemption for certain components found in external walls and specified attachments. Then we move on to material change of use. 10.13 says that, regulations 5K and 6 3 provide that, where the use of a building is changed such that the building becomes a building described in regulations 7 4, the construction of the external walls, and specified attachments, must be investigated and, where necessary, work must be carried out to ensure they only contain materials achieving class A2-S1 D0 or class A1, other than those exempted by regulation 7 3. Then under additional considerations, section 10.14 states that, the provisions of regulation 7 apply in addition to requirement B4. Therefore, for buildings described in regulation 7 4, the potential impact of any products incorporated into or onto the external walls and specified attachments should be carefully considered with regard to their number, size, orientation and position.

 

On the 10.15 particular attention is drawn to the following points. A, membranes used as part of the external wall construction above ground level, should achieve a minimum of class BS3DO. B, internal linings should comply with the guidance provided in section 4. C, any part of a roof should achieve the minimum performance as detailed in section 12. D, as per regulation 7 3, window frames and glass, including laminated glass, are exempted from regulation 7 2. Window spandrel panels and infill panels must comply with regulation 7 2. E, thermal breaks are small elements used as part of the external wall construction to restrict thermal bridging. There is no minimum performance for these materials. However, they should not span two compartments and should be limited in size to the minimum required to restrict the thermal bridging, the principle insulation layer is not to be regarded as a thermal break. F, regulation 7 2 only applies to specified attachments. Shop front signs and similar attachments are not covered by the requirements of regulation 7 2, although attention is drawn to paragraph 10.15 G. G, while regulation 7 2 applies to materials which become part of an external wall or specified attachment, consideration should be given to other attachments to the wall which could impact on the risk of fire spread over the wall.

 

Then we move on to the additional requirements. Approved Document B volume 2 regarding buildings other than dwellings. The full document can be downloaded at the end of this CPD.

 

However, we have included section 12 below, which relates to other types of relevant residential buildings over 18 metres in height.

 

Section 12 relates to resisting fire spread over external walls.

In the introduction section 12.1 states that, the external wall of a building should not provide a medium for fire spread if that is likely to be a risk to health and safety. Combustible materials and cavities in external walls and attachments to them can present such a risk particularly in tall buildings. The guidance in this section is designed to reduce the risk of vertical fire spread as well as the risk of ignition from flames coming from adjacent buildings. Under fire resistance section 12.2 states that, this section does not deal with fire resistance for external walls. An external wall may need fire resistance to meet the requirements of Section 5, general provisions, Section 7, load bearing elements of structures, or section 13, resisting fire spread from one building to another.

 

Combustibility of external walls 12.3. The external walls of buildings other than those described in regulation 7 4 of the building regulations should achieve either of the following. A, follow the provisions given in paragraphs 12.5 to 12.9, which provide guidance on all of the following. 1, external surfaces; 2, materials and products; 3, cavities and cavity barriers. B, meet the performance criteria given in BRE reports BR 135 for external walls using full scale test data from BS8414-1 or BS8414-2. 12.4 in relation to buildings of any height or use, consideration should be given to the choice of materials, including their extent and arrangement used for the external wall, or attachments to the wall, to reduce the risk of fire spread over the wall. External surfaces 12.5 the external surfaces, i.e. Outer most external material of external walls should comply with the provisions in table 12.1. The provisions in table 12.1 applied to each wall individually in relation to its proximity to the relevant boundary.

 

Table 12.1 shows the reaction to fire performance of external surface of walls. I'll give you a moment to read through. The note stipulated that in addition to the requirements within this table, buildings with a top occupied story above 18 metres should also meet the provisions of paragraph 12.6. In all cases the advice in paragraph 12.4 should be followed.1, the restrictions for these buildings apply to all the materials used in the external wall and specified attachments see paragraphs 12.10 to 12.13 for further guidance. 2, profiled or flat steel sheet at least 0.5 MM thick with an organic coating of no more than 0.2MM thickness, is also acceptable. 3, timber cladding at least 9MM thick is also acceptable. 4, 10 metres is measured from the top surface of the roof.

 

Under materials and products section 12.6, in a building with a story 18 meters or more in height, see diagram D6 in appendix D, any insulation product filler material such as, the core materials of metal composite panels, sandwich panels and window spandrel panels, but not including gaskets, sealants and similar etcetera, used in the construction of an external law should be class A2-S3 D2 or better, see appendix B. This restriction does not apply to masonry cavity wall construction which complies with diagram 9.2 in section 9. Where regulation 7 2 applies, that regulation prevails over all the provisions in this paragraph. 12.7 states that, best practice guidance for green walls, also called living walls, can be found in fire performance of green roofs and walls, published by the department for communities and local government.

 

Under cavities and cavity barriers section 12.8 says that, cavity barriers should be provided in accordance with section 9. 12.9 states that, in the case of an external wall construction of a building which by virtue of paragraph 9.10 D, external cladding system with a masonry or concrete inner leaf, is not subject to the provisions of table 9.1, the surfaces which face into cavities should also meet the provisions of table 12.1 and provisions in section 9, but where regulation 7 2 applies, that regulation prevails over the guidance provided in table 12.1 and section 9. Then we move on to regulation 7 2 and requirement B4 regarding materials. Section 12.10 states that, regulation 7 1 A requires that materials used in building work are appropriate for the circumstances in which they are used. Regulation 7 2 sets requirements in respect of external walls and specified attachments in relevant buildings. Please note, guidance on regulation 7 1 can be found in approved document 7. 12.11 states that, regulation 7 2 applies to any building with a storey at least 18 metres above ground level, as measured in accordance with diagram D6 in appendix D, and which contains one or more dwellings; an institution; or a room for residential purposes, excluding any room in a hostel, hotel or boarding house. It requires that all materials which become part of an external wall or specified attachment achieve class A2-S1 D0 or class A1, other than those exempted by regulation 7 3. Please note, the above include student accommodation care homes, sheltered housing, hospitals and dormitories in boarding schools. See regulations 7 4 for the definition of relevant buildings. Please note the requirement in regulation 7 2 is limited to materials achieving class A2-S1 D0 or class A1.

 

Section 12.12 states that, external walls and specified attachments are defined in regulation 2 and these definitions include any parts of the external wall as well as balconies, solar panels and sun shading. 12.13 says that, regulation 7 3 provides an exemption for certain components found in external walls and specified attachments. Under material change of use section 12.14 states that, regulations 5K and 6 3 provide that, where the use of a building is changed such as the building becomes a building described in regulation 7 4, the construction of the external walls, and specified attachments, must be investigated and, where necessary, work must be carried out to ensure they only contain materials achieving class A2-S1 D0 or class A1, other than those exempted by regulation 7 3. Regarding additional considerations section 12.15 states that, the provisions of regulation 7 apply in addition to the requirement B4. Therefore, for buildings described in regulation 7 4, the potential impact of any products incorporated into or onto the external walls and specified attachments should be carefully considered with regard to their number, size, orientation and position.

 

And then section 12.16 states that, particular attention is drawn to the following points. A, membranes used as part of the external wall construction above ground level should achieve a minimum of class BS3 D0. B, internal lining should comply with the guidance provided in section 6. C, any part of a roof should you should achieve the minimum performance as detailed in section 14. D, as per regulation 7 3, window frames and glass including laminated glass or exempted from regulation 7 2, window spandrel panels and infill panels must comply with regulation 7 2. E, thermal breaks are small elements used as part of the external wall construction to restrict thermal bridging. There is no minimum performance for these materials. However, they should not span two compartments and should be limited in size to the minimum required to restrict the thermal bridging, the principle insulation layer is not to be regarded as a thermal break. F, Regulation 7 2 only applies to specified attachments. Shop front signs and similar attachments are not covered by the requirements of regulation 7 2, although attention is drawn to paragraph 12.16 G. G, while regulation 7 2 applies to the materials which become part of an external wall or specified attachment, consideration should be given to other attachments to the wall which could impact on the risk of fire spread over the wall.

 

High Quality Solutions


Now that you are familiarised yourself with both the building amendment regulations 2018, the advice note on balconies on residential buildings, and the additional requirements from the approved document B, you will be taken through a small selection of products which have been introduced to provide high quality solutions to the issues raised in those documents.

 

Aluminium decking has seen a huge rise in demand since the new regulations were introduced and, even more so when the advice note was issued. This is because aluminium decking is the perfect flooring solution for balconies on residential buildings and commercial buildings. It is naturally non-combustible which means it meets the legal requirements, and it is high in strength, light in weight and naturally rust resistant, which means it will last for many many years. Aluminium also requires minimal maintenance, which is much better for the end user saving them time and money.

 

Aluminium decking is an eco-friendly, long lasting alternative to traditional style decking such as timber or composite. The next three screens will take you through two different types of aluminium decking boards for balconies and an aluminium drain channel for those boards. These products are made from 100% aluminium which is 100% recyclable an infinite amount of times.

 

These aluminium balcony decking boards have been designed specifically for installation on balcony installations on high rise buildings.

 

There are two boards within the range which measure 20MM and 30MM deep. 

 

This fire resistant balcony decking is light in weight yet high in load bearing capacity meaning, it requires less supporting steelwork than heavier materials, thereby significantly reducing costs.

 

The installation time is up to 50% quicker than other products on the market due to the quick fit clipping feature which saves time on site. The aluminium balcony decking boards have many features which include, each board is 120MM wide with a choice of two lengths 4M and 6M and, a choice of two depths which are 20MM and 30MM. The boards can be cut to the correct width to enable a perfect fit, while still being structurally stable on point load; they have fire resistant to A2 S-1 DO, which means they make no contribution to fire and meets the legal requirements detailed in the two documents covered in this CPD.

 

Up to 90% of the decking can be installed before the installation of the balcony to save time. Once the balcony structure has been installed the remaining boards can then be installed. The boards can be installed onto existing sub frame sections without having to drill additional holes on site saving valuable time. Full drainage is available between the decking boards with the use of the aluminium drain channel; they have an allowable span of 1200MM on a 4KN load for the 30MM thick boards and 495MM on a 4KN load for the 20MM thick boards.

 

The boards are manufactured completely from aluminium only, 606 3 T6 grade, up to 30% of which is recycled aluminium making these boards eco-friendly and much better for the environment.

 

The boards are treated with Qualicoat powder coating finish and is a quality label organisation that is committed to maintaining and promoting the quality of coating on aluminium and its alloys for architectural applications. They are supplied with a 30 year warranty against splitting cracking, warping, splintering, rotting, twisting and material or manufacturing defects and, have a very impressive 60 year life expectancy. Aluminium is a naturally rust resistant material so you know it will last for many many years.

 

The aluminium flat balcony board is an all-aluminium decking board that is suitable for installations on balconies in high rise buildings. It features the same specification as the previous board, yet it has a flat surface with indented grooves rather than raised ridges. This makes it much more pleasant to walk upon when barefoot, making it a very popular choice for residential balconies such as high rise flats and apartments. As with the other board these are also fire resistant to A2 S1 D0. The aluminium flat balcony board has the same features as the aluminium balcony board which is shown on screen.

 

This drain channel is an aluminium insert which sits in between two decking boards to catch any rainwater and any spillages that may fall onto the decking, stopping them dripping onto passers-by underneath. It is available with both balcony decking boards. During the installation you can direct the water that fills the drain channel to a guttering down pipe or area of your choice.

 

The aluminium drain channel benefits from a wealth of features including, the drain channel creates a full drainage system with the use of down pipes and gutters by enabling drainage between the boards. It reduces rainwater dripping onto the people or furniture underneath. It reduces the risk of hot drinks spilling onto passers-by underneath, it is available with the 30MM balcony and 30MM balcony flat decking boards. It is fire resistant to A2S1 D0, which means it makes no contribution to fire and meets the legal requirements.

 

The boards are manufactured completely from aluminium only 6063 T6 grade up to 30% of which is recycled aluminium, making these boards eco-friendly and much better for the environment. Powder coated treated with Qualicoat powder coating finish and is a quality label organization that is committed to maintaining and promoting the quality of coating on aluminium and its alloys, for architectural applications. It is supplied with a 30 year warranty against splitting, cracking, warping, splintering, rotting, twisting and material or manufacturing defects and a 60 year life expectancy. And last but not least aluminium is a naturally rust resistant material so you can rest assured that this drain channel will stand the test of time.

 

You have almost completed the CPD. You will now be taken to the resources section.

 

Please visit www.abelcanopies.co.uk/cpd to download all documents mentioned in this CPD including, the building amendment regulations 2018, the advice note on balconies on residential buildings, approved document B volume 1, approved document B volume 2, data sheets for both aluminium decking boards and the drain channel and, the Warrington fire classification reports.

 

Thank you very much for taking time to partake in this CPD. If you would like to download any of the resource is provided, please visit www.abelcanopies.co.uk/cpd or contact able canopies limited for further information regarding aluminium decking boards and accessories. You can call us on 0800-389-9072, email us at sales@abelcanopies.co.uk or visit our website which is www.ablecanopies.co.uk.

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